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Presentation: Pendente Lite Orders in Virginia


This is a presentation on pendente lite (or temporary) orders in Virginia, which can be obtained while family law cases are being litigated.

This blog is an advertisement for the Law Office of Philip R. Yabut, PLLC, and the information in this post is not to be construed as legal advice, nor does reading it form an attorney-client relationship. Please do not post confidential information in the comments section.

Philip R. Yabut, Esq. || 1100 N. Glebe Road, Suite 1010, Arlington, VA 22201 || (571) 393-1236 || pyabut01@gmail.com

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What can be included in spousal support?


"the provider" by author

“the provider” by author

When a marriage ends, there is always the possibility of a significant decrease of income for each party, especially if one of the parties made a lot more money than the other.  The purpose of spousal support (alimony) is to help alleviate the sudden reduction in income for the more disadvantaged party.

Spousal support can be negotiated between the parties or determined by a judge, and it is usually meant to be temporary, ending after a specified term, remarriage by the party receiving payments, or the death of either spouse.  However, a judge can establish permanent support under certain circumstances, such as the supported spouse’s inability to become self-supporting.

If the parties cannot reach an agreement for spousal support, the judge is required to take the following factors into consideration, as listed in Va. Code § 20-107.1:

1. The obligations, needs and financial resources of the parties, including but not limited to income from all pension, profit sharing or retirement plans, of whatever nature;

2. The standard of living established during the marriage;

3. The duration of the marriage;

4. The age and physical and mental condition of the parties and any special circumstances of the family;

5. The extent to which the age, physical or mental condition or special circumstances of any child of the parties would make it appropriate that a party not seek employment outside of the home;

6. The contributions, monetary and nonmonetary, of each party to the well-being of the family;

7. The property interests of the parties, both real and personal, tangible and intangible;

8. The provisions made with regard to the marital property under § 20-107.3;

9. The earning capacity, including the skills, education and training of the parties and the present employment opportunities for persons possessing such earning capacity;

10. The opportunity for, ability of, and the time and costs involved for a party to acquire the appropriate education, training and employment to obtain the skills needed to enhance his or her earning ability;

11. The decisions regarding employment, career, economics, education and parenting arrangements made by the parties during the marriage and their effect on present and future earning potential, including the length of time one or both of the parties have been absent from the job market;

12. The extent to which either party has contributed to the attainment of education, training, career position or profession of the other party; and

13. Such other factors, including the tax consequences to each party, as are necessary to consider the equities between the parties.

This blog is an advertisement for the Law Office of Philip R. Yabut, PLLC, and the information in this post is not to be construed as legal advice, nor does reading it form an attorney-client relationship. Please do not post confidential information in the comments section.

Philip R. Yabut, Esq. || 1100 N. Glebe Road, Suite 1010, Arlington, VA 22201 || (571) 393-1236 || pyabut01@gmail.com

Change a Judge Can Believe In


Grand Canyon Mather Point Spring Storm 2011_5067a
National Park Service

To paraphrase the old philosopher Heraclitus, change is the only constant in the universe. Everything in nature is in continuous movement, and one never sees the exact same thing twice. You can go to the same spot overlooking the Grand Canyon a thousand times, but each visit is unique, a little (or a lot) different. No matter how similar it looks, if you examine your surroundings more closely, you’ll find differences both obvious and subtle.

In family law, change is paramount in cases of child and spousal support. After the judge’s initial support decree, the parties have two choices: live with it until it expires on its own, or try to amend it. Both the Virginia and District of Columbia codes provide for modification of support orders if the party asking for it can show a material change in circumstances.   That change can be as major as a new (or loss of a) job, marriage, health problems — or something as mundane as the passage of time.  If you show the judge that things are different, you can get more (or be compelled to provide less) support for yourself or your children.

Support guidelines are generally mechanical in nature — you both supply income and assets/liabilities information and, for the most part, the judge chooses the number that comes up.  The judge has some leeway for extenuating circumstances like those I mentioned above.  When you seek a support order modification, be sure to tell your attorney everything you can think of that can or actually does affect your financial status, no matter how mundane.  Because even the smallest change can be significant.

This blog is an advertisement for the Law Office of Philip R. Yabut, PLLC, and the information in this post is not to be construed as legal advice, nor does reading it form an attorney-client relationship. Please do not post confidential information in the comments section.